Capacity Building Program 

 Flowers School of Technology & Management

Flowers School of Technology & Management

Why Capacity Building?

  Dr. Alfred Latigo lectures on Africa's social & economic development to students at the Universities of Benin and Parakou, West Africa, 2012 on the invitation of  Prof. Jules   Dégila, Professor of Telecommunications Engineering, University of Benin and a member of GIDE Advisory Council.

Dr. Alfred Latigo lectures on Africa's social & economic development to students at the Universities of Benin and Parakou, West Africa, 2012 on the invitation of  Prof. Jules Dégila, Professor of Telecommunications Engineering, University of Benin and a member of GIDE Advisory Council.

1.      A growing number of governments in low income countries are trying to improve their performance through enhanced capacity so they can operate more efficiently and provide better services to their people.  Governments, international agencies and civil society organizations (CSOs) need to know how policies and programs shape the lives of people today and in future generations.  And, it is now widely acknowledged that national development policies and programs should be informed by evidence generated by country-led monitoring and evaluation systems, rather than donor-led ones or based on opinion, while ensuring policy coherence at regional and global level.  

2.      The Malabo Declaration of Heads of State and Government of the African Union (June 24-27, 2014) in Equatorial Guinea on “Transforming Africa’s Agriculture for Shared Prosperity and Improved Livelihoods through Harnessing Opportunities for Inclusive Growth and Sustainable Development" endorsed the commitment of African countries to  "evidence-based planning,  policy, efficiency, dialogue,  review and accountability" and  "Strengthening national and regional capacities for  knowledge generation and management that support evidence-based planning, implementation,  monitoring and evaluation".

3.     Year 2015 was officially declared as the International Year of Evaluation at the Third International Conference on National Evaluation Capacities held in São Paulo, Brazil, 29 September-2 October 2013. The aim of the International Year of Evaluation is to strengthen the demand for and use of evaluation and evidence-based policy making at international, regional, national and local levels.  And, in 2015 the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) will be replaced by a new set of internationally agreed goals, most likely to be called Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). While the MDGs drove a global vision on human development and facilitated its implementation and monitoring, a comprehensive evaluation of what has been achieved has not been carried out so far. This is partly because the country level building blocks for such a review were not available. Also, citizen demands for evidence and greater accountability from governments are growing world-wide. The International Year of Evaluation, the upcoming SDGs and the growing bottom up movement for greater accountability that is leading to new innovations to strengthen and hold policy makers accountable together present a strong case for strengthening national capacity in impact evaluation in the coming years. Consequently, capacity building especially in impact evaluation is now a top priority for GIDE.

Objective of GIDE’s Capacity Building Program

The aim of GIDE's capacity building program is to enhance the capacities of national policy makers, researchers and CSOs to contribute to the improved country-led evaluation systems and policies for inclusive green growth.

In collaboration with Flowers School of Technology and Management, Germany & United Kingdom, and the R&G Economic Consultants, the Global Institute for Development Evidence (GIDE), Hawaii, USA, Uganda and Zambia provides specialist training in Impact Evaluation (Systematic Reviews), Performance Evaluation of Projects, Programs and Policies, Environmental Impact Assessment and Mainstreaming Regional Integration through a blended learning mode. The course participants can elect to attend instructor-led highly participatory high impact training seminars and continue at their own pace through the Flowers Online Learning portal or via instructor-facilitated online learning. Professionals in government institutions, non-governmental organisations and academics in the environmental sciences, political science and economics will find these training programs helpful for enhanced decision-making.

To realize this objective, GIDE and its partners expect to work with and get support from bilateral and international development agencies operating in Africa. These institutions include the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Union Commission (AUC), the African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), The Regional Economic Communities (RECs), The United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), and the World Bank.

 Course Faculty: Dr. Alfred Latigo, Prof. Raphael O. Olaniyan and Prof. Francis Ejobi

1. Systematic Reviews (Evidence Based Practice)

GIDE in collaboration with the Flowers School of Management and Technology has embarked on the following program on Systematic Reviews:

- Developing a Training Manual on Systematic Reviews: Meta Data Analysis and Narrative Synthesis

Training on Narrative Synthesis and Meta Data Analysis in Social and Economic Development, Agriculture; and Environment and Natural Resources through i) On line  and in-class courses; and ii) Hands-on workshops in Africa and Asia.

2. Environmental Impact Assessment

Theoretical Background

Mainstreaming Cross-cutting Issues in a Project Cycle: Environmental and natural resource degradation can be caused by too little or too much economic development. Rural poverty and population pressure often combine to exert stress on productive natural systems through for example, degradation of range and pasture lands due to overgrazing; loss of productive soils as a result of inappropriate agricultural practices. Urban areas too are affected by population growth resulting often from the influx of people from rural areas; urban sprawl and industrialization give rise to polluted water and air, congestion and increased incidence of disease. These problems are in effect the result of inadequate development, part of their solution lies in well-planned economic growth. On the other hand economic growth itself often results in environmental and resource degradation or climate change. For instance, many large infrastructure projects including dams and reservoirs or road and service developments, can lead to the resettlement of large numbers of people with associated social, environmental and economic impacts. Rapid economic growth often aggravates urban pollution and congestion.

It is rare that a choice must be made between development and the environment; rather it is generally a question of understanding and incorporating cost-effective measures to restore, sustain and protect natural systems and maintain environmental quality at the earliest stages of planning. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is the information gathering and analytical process that helps to ensure sustainable inclusive green growth. The EIA process attempts to identify potential problems so that economic feasibility (and environmental impact) of alternative approaches can be assessed while there is still time to make changes. Thus, EIA complements conventional packages of engineering, socioeconomic, and financial and economic analysis and provides practical advice to planners. EIA is now mandatory in development process world-wide though capacity to undertake it is grossly inadequate especially in developing countries, hence the need for this kind of training.

3. Mainstreaming Regional Integration in National Plans

H.E. Dr. Kenneth Kaunda (GCEZ), First President of the Republic of Zambia (left) at a function in Lusaka, Zambia when he launched Dr. Latigo’s book “The Best Options for Africa” in 2010.   President Kaunda who had also endorsed the book is one of the Visionary African founding leaders who in 1980 adopted the Lagos Plan of Action for an African Economic Community - "the United States of Africa".  The book argues that Africans can use their huge natural resource endowment and abundant human resources to turn the continent into a global economic power and a better place to live in.

  Disoveries Kirkus a leading source for unbiased  for  unbiased, professional reviews of books  describes the “The Best Options for Africa:     11 Political, Economic & Divine Principles  ” as an original, stimulating pep talk for a continent

Disoveries Kirkus a leading source for unbiased for unbiased, professional reviews of books describes the “The Best Options for Africa: 11 Political, Economic & Divine Principles” as an original, stimulating pep talk for a continent

A key challenge in RI is the slow implementation of integration process by African countries arising from lack of necessary institutional mechanisms for achieving their objectives. This is often evident in inconsistencies between national legislation and integration commitments and mechanisms and in the absence of strong enforcement mechanisms. RI initiatives require a large degree of public management and implementation at national levels. Without an absolute commitment to implementation at the national level, there can be no progress at the sub-regional and continental levels. Therefore, doing nothing or little to implement agreed programs at the national level can severely hamper the integration agenda. To foster integration and turn it into leverage for development, member States have to come out with clear “mainstreaming” strategies for domesticating the Africa-wide RI agenda into National Development Plans (NDPs). The process of mainstreaming refers to the systematic integration of the objectives and related initiatives of RI as well as the process of creating ownership of the agenda into the overall NDPs, poverty reduction strategies and in the society in order to attain the “popular legitimacy” necessary for the success of RI. More broadly, the concept of mainstreaming RI should ultimately contribute to economic growth, poverty alleviation and overall socio-economic development. Though crucial to Africa’s development, the concept of mainstreaming RI is still little understood or practiced, hence the need to build the capacity to implement it in African countries.

 To learn more and register your interest, click here.

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http://flowers.ac/index.php/courses/business-and-management/item/194-mainstreaming-regional-integration

Comments:

Once site visitors click on “here”, a new window would open to enable them read more on Course Scope, Core Subjects, Prerequisites, Objectives, Additional Information and how to register their interest.

To learn more and register your interest, click here.

 Note: Should you require the actual URL to insert to hyperlink the text “here” above to open in New Window, here is it below:

http://flowers.ac/index.php/courses/business-and-management/item/193-environmental-impact-assessment

 Comments: Once site visitors click on “here”, a new window would open to enable them read more on Course Scope, Core Subjects, Prerequisites, Objectives, Additional Information and how to register their interest.