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IMPROVING LIVES THROUGH WHAT WORKS

 

-IMPACT EVALUATION OF POLICIES, PROGRAMS & PROJECTS

-MAINSTREAMING ENVIRONMENTAL & SOCIAL SAFEGUARDS IN POLICIES, PROGRAMS & PROJECTS 

-CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION 

-CAPACITY BUILDING

Issues

The Global Institute for Development Evidence (GIDE) which was founded in 1990, aims to increase development effectiveness through Impact Evaluation (IE) by providing decision makers with credible policy-ready evidence of what works for better planning and policy making to realize Inclusive Green Growth (IGG) in low income countries of Africa and Asia. 

"Inclusive Green growth is growth that is efficient, clean, and resilient—efficient in its use of natural resources, clean in that it minimizes pollution and environmental impacts, and resilient in that it accounts for natural hazards and the role of environmental management and natural capital in preventing physical disasters. It is growth needs to be inclusive embracing social, economic and environmental pillars and is promoted based on principles of inclusiveness, equity, particularly gender equity and women’s empowerment, and sustainability. It supports the alleviation of poverty through green job creation, sustainable energy for all, low-carbon technologies; and promotion of sustainable urban living. It recognizes the importance of and interplay between natural capital and social capital, equally important assets that must be managed and invested in” (World Bank, UNDP).

By providing credible information for better project, program or policy outcomes, GIDE works with policy makers, clients and partners to help vulnerable populations access productive resources to boost their business and livelihood. [Photo by A. Latigo: Women selling smoked fish on the River Nile shores, Northern Uganda].

By providing credible information for better project, program or policy outcomes, GIDE works with policy makers, clients and partners to help vulnerable populations access productive resources to boost their business and livelihood. [Photo by A. Latigo: Women selling smoked fish on the River Nile shores, Northern Uganda].

The bottom line is, low income countries now urgently need to mainstream environmental sustainability into their fast growing economies to achieve their goal of poverty reduction, agricultural productivity, employment, entrepreneurship, income and gender equalities (social inclusion), and climate change mitigation and adaptation.  GIDE was created just to help these countries realize this goal through three innovative ways of impact evaluation: (i) provide solutions to the existing challenges in using credible information on what works; (ii) enhance capacity of national policy makers and practitioners to use evidence in their planning and policy making; and (iii) produce and disseminate to decision makers, policy-ready  information of what works, when, why and how much.

 Impact Evaluation (IE): Impact Evaluation (IE) is the positive and negative, intended and unintended, direct and indirect, primary and secondary effects produced by an intervention. Credible and appropriate impact evaluation can greatly improve the effectiveness of development.  

IE is undertaken for the following reasons:

Flooding is an increasingly serious and common natural disaster world-wide, yet there is often no policy-ready evidence decision makers can use to protect vulnerable populations from it. [Photo by Getty Images, Pakistan].

  • To decide whether to fund an intervention – “ex-ante evaluation” is conducted before an intervention is implemented,to estimate its likely impacts and inform funding decisions.
  • To decide whether or not to continue or expand an intervention
  • To learn how to successfully adapt a successful intervention to suit another context
  • To reassure funders, including donors and taxpayers (upward accountability), that money is being wisely invested – to learn
    what does and doesn’t work, and use this information to improve future implementation and investment decisions
  • To inform intended beneficiaries and communities (downward accountability) about whether or not, and in what ways a program is benefiting the community.